internetscout|dlese.org

This informational tour offers students a basic understanding of geologic time, the evidence for events in the history of the Earth, relative and absolute dating techniques, and the significance of the Geologic Time Scale. Students move at a self-selected pace by answering questions correctly as they go. The teacher's guide contains all the details needed to use this computer activity, including handouts, a lesson plan, and assessment materials.

Summary

SubjectsChemistry, Geoscience, Life Science, Physics, Space Science
Education levelHigh School, Middle School
Resource typesInstructional Material
Resource formatapplication, application/java, text, text/html
Languageen
PublisherUniversity of California, Berkeley
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/2200/20061003230008455T

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Rights and restrictions

CopyrightCopyright 1994-2002 by The University of California Museum of Paleontology, Berkeley, and the Regents of the University of California. All materials appearing on the UCMP Web Servers may not be reproduced or stored in a retrieval system without prior written permission of the publisher and in no case for profit.


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Found in collection(s)

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Internet Scout ProjectDLESE: Digital Library for Earth System Education
Title Internet Scout Project
Link http://scout.wisc.edu/
Description The Internet Scout Report provides evaluation and annotation of high-quality online resources, particularly those that will be of value to the education community. Each resource is selected, researched, and annotated by a team of professional librarians and subject-matter experts, who evaluate sites on the basis of their content, authority, upkeep, presentation, availability, and cost. Published since 1994, the Report is one of the internet's oldest and most respected publications. The Internet Scout Project is part of the College of Letters and Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison.